Child Immunisations and Vaccinations

Why Vaccines are Important

Vaccination is the most important thing we can do to protect ourselves and our children against ill health. They prevent up to 3 million deaths worldwide every year.

Since vaccines were introduced in the UK, diseases like smallpox, polio and tetanus that used to kill or disable millions of people are either gone or seen very rarely.

Other diseases like measles and diphtheria have been reduced by up to 99.9% since their vaccines were introduced.

However, if people stop having vaccines, it's possible for infectious diseases to quickly spread again.


Things to Know What Vaccines Do and Don't

Childhood Vaccines


How Vaccines Work

Vaccines teach your immune system how to create antibodies that protect you from diseases.

It's much safer for your immune system to learn this through vaccination than by catching the diseases and treating them.

Once your immune system knows how to fight a disease, it can often protect you for many years.

All vaccines are thoroughly tested to make sure they will not harm you or your child.

It often takes many years for a vaccine to make it through the trials and tests it needs to pass for approval.

Once a vaccine is being used in the UK it's also monitored for any rare side effects by the Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA).

Anyone can report a suspected side effect of vaccination to the MHRA through the Yellow Card Scheme.


Routine Childhood Immunisations Schedule 

When to immunise

Diseases protected against

Vaccine given

Site**

Two months oldDiphtheria, tetanus, pertussis, polio and Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib)DTaP/IPV/Hib (Pediacel)Thigh
Pneumococcal diseasePCV (Prevenar 13)Thigh
RotavirusRotavirus (Rotarix)By mouth
Three months oldDiphtheria, tetanus, pertussis, polio and HibDTaP/IPV/Hib (Pediacel)Thigh
Meningococcal group C disease (MenC)Men C (NeisVac-C or Menjugate)Thigh
RotavirusRotavirus (Rotarix)By mouth
Four months oldDiphtheria, tetanus, pertussis, polio and HibDTaP/IPV/Hib (Pediacel)Thigh
Pneumococcal diseasePCV (Prevenar 13)Thigh
Between 12 and 13 months old – within a month of the first birthdayHib/MenCHib/MenC (Menitorix)Upper arm/thigh
Pneumococcal diseasePCV (Prevenar 13)Upper arm/thigh
Measles, mumps and rubella (German measles)MMR (Priorix or MMR VaxPRO)Upper arm/thigh
Three years four months old or soon afterDiphtheria, tetanus, pertussis and poliodTaP/IPV (Repevax) or DTaP/IPV(Infanrix-IPV)Upper arm
Measles, mumps and rubellaMMR (Priorix or MMR VaxPRO)(check first dose has been given)Upper arm
Girls aged 12 to 13 years oldCervical cancer caused by human papillomavirus types 16 and 18 (and genital warts caused by types 6 and 11)HPV (Gardasil)Upper arm
Around 14 years oldTetanus, diphtheria and polioTd/IPV (Revaxis), and check MMR statusUpper arm
Meningitis C(Meningitec, Menjugate or NeisVac-C)Upper arm

 Please note

** Where two or more injections are required at once, these should ideally be given in different limbs. Where this is not possible, injections in the same limb should be given 2.5cm apart.

The Meningitis C vaccination will be introduced during the 2013/14 academic year and the vaccine supplied will depend on the brands available at the time of ordering.


Immunisations for at-risk children  

When to immunise

Diseases protected against

Vaccine given

Site

At birth, 1 month old, 2 months old and 12 months oldHepatitis BHep BThigh
At birthTuberculosisBCGUpper arm (intradermal)

Content last updated: 04 August 2020

Further Resources: https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/vaccinations/why-vaccination-is-safe-and-important/



 
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